People


  • Astha Arora

    Astha is an Assistant Specialist in the Grover Lab at UCR.





  • Brittney McKenzie

    Brittney is a PhD Student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCR. She earned her B.S. in Bioengineering and minor in Applied Mathematics at the University of Washington in 2013. Before joining the Grover Lab, Brittney spent a year and a half as an undergraduate researcher in Dr. Elain Fu’s lab with a focus in paper microfluidic device and tool development for low-cost diagnostic applications. While in the Fu Lab, she developed a new method of sequencing fluids in paper devices and co-authored a publication on this research. Her current research interests are in developing tools and microdevices for diagnostic applications.


  • Heran Bhakta

    Heran is a PhD student in the Department of Bioengineering at UC Riverside.






  • Jessica Robles

    Jessica is a senior undergraduate student majoring in Bioengineering at the University of California, Riverside. She is planning on pursuing her graduate degree in bioengineering. Her current research interests are in creating microfluidic devices that are both cost-effective and easy to implement. In her free time she enjoys swimming and traveling.


  • Raymond Yeung

    Raymond is a PhD student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCR. He obtained his B.S. in Chemical Biology at the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. During his undergraduate and post-baccalaureate studies, he spent two years in Prof. Angelica Stacy’s lab at UCB where he characterized the process for production of flexible porous aluminum oxide and worked concurrently in Prof. Shuvo Roy’s group at UCSF where he investigated the immunoprotection of pancreatic islets using silicon nanopore membranes. He received his M.S. in Bioengineering at UCR in 2017. For his thesis work in Prof. Victor G. J. Rodger’s group, Raymond studied the separation of proteins using electrically conductive ultrafiltration membranes. His current research interests revolve around tailoring transport characteristics to develop tools for therapeutic and industrial applications.


  • Shivam Kardani

    Shivam is an undergraduate student in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Riverside. His current research interests in the Grover Lab are to create and use microfluidic devices to characterize both organic and inorganic substances.


  • Vamsi Choday

    Vamsi is a senior undergraduate student majoring in Bioengineering at UCR. He will be graduating in June 2018, and will be pursuing a graduate degree in Biomechanics. His senior design project, The Mantis System, leveraged various sensors, a webcam for gaze detection, an Arduino microcontroller, and two Raspberry Pi computers to detect and prevent the events of distracted driving, drowsy driving, and aggressive driving. His current research interests are in utilizing off-the-shelf hardware and electronics to develop cost-effective and easily-accessible instrumentation. He enjoys playing basketball, collecting sneakers, and working on small DIY projects during his free time.


  • William H. Grover

    Dr. Grover is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Riverside. Prior to joining UCR, Dr. Grover received his postdoctoral training in the Biological Engineering Division at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In Prof. Scott Manalis’ group at MIT, Dr. Grover used the group’s microfluidic mass sensors to make the first precision measurements of the density of single living cells. Dr. Grover obtained his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. In Prof. Richard Mathies’ group at UC Berkeley, Dr. Grover developed microfluidic “processors” that bridged the chemical, biological, and computational sciences. A native of Tennessee, Dr. Grover received his B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

    Dr. Grover’s ORCID ID

Alumni


  • Douglas Hill

    Douglas Hill graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, in June 1979. Hill’s first job was with Texas Instruments, where he was given the honor of being the only junior engineer awarded ‘key contributor’. Hill then started his own system design house, Advanced Electronic Packaging Corp., solving packaging problems for many of the major corporations in the United States for over 20 years. Currently, Hill is in the Bioengineering graduate program at the University of California, Riverside, investigating the packaging of microfluidics. Hill’s research interests include applying microfluidics in preventive medicine, and developing a FRET based system for measuring reaction kinetics.


  • Junchao Wang

    Junchao is a PhD student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCR. He obtained his B.E. in Bioengineering from Jiangnan University in Wuxi, China. During his undergraduate studies, he spent 2 years in Dr. Ye Ni’s lab and focused on producing chiral pharmaceutical intermediates by biocatalysis. In the Grover Lab Junchao is developing innovative ways to design microfluidic devices. He enjoys soccer in his spare time.


  • Kevin Pham

    Kevin is a MS student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCR.





  • Nazila Norouzi

    Nazila is a PhD Student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCR. She obtained her B.S. in Biomedical engineering from the University of California, Irvine in 2010. During her undergraduate studies she spent two years as a research assistant in Mechanobiology Lab in Beckman Laser Institute, Irvine and one year in Microfluidic lab. In addition, her senior design project was awarded by National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance’s (NCIIA) BMEidea competition. She also obtained her M.S. in Biomedical engineering from the University of California, Irvine in 2012. During her M.S. studies, her focus was on Microfluidic and Microdevices for diagnostic applications. She has two journal publications and three conference papers. Her current research interests lie in the field of Microfluidic and Microdevices and when not in the lab, she spends her time painting and playing volleyball.


  • Shirin Mesbah Oskui

    Shirin is a PhD student in the Department of Bioengineering at UCR. She obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied flow dynamics in freshwater and marine ecosystems. Before joining the Grover Lab, Shirin worked as a graduate student researcher in the Vafai Lab studying transport phenomena in porous media. Her research interests lie in developing tools for precise, real-time measurement of micro-scale pathogens and pollutants affecting our air and water systems. When not in lab, Shirin enjoys climbing rocks, biking, and planning events for the Association for Women in Science (AWIS), Inland Empire Chapter.